How do you read e-books?

Dedicated reader? A tablet? Phone? Or maybe a mix of everything

The e-book market has come a long way since the original Kindle launched in 2007. While Amazon is still the giant in this space, other e-readers continue to battle for second place, offering advanced features like color displays, stylus support, and more. Of course, not everyone is reliant on digital books these days — Barnes and Noble has seen something of a comeback in recent years, thanks to the rebounding popularity of hardcover and paperback books — but for many, the flexibility of e-books is the way to go

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I still remember when e-readers were luxury gadgets. As a teenager, I wanted one more than anything. Whether or not my choice in picking up a first-gen Nook — with the touchscreen and everything — was a good one, I was elated when I finally got it. Since then, I’ve moved to a Kindle, something I assume plenty of people picked up during this past week’s Prime Day sales. Even with those discounts over, Amazon’s lineup of e-readers remains an affordable entryway into digital reading, a device that pairs perfectly with a modern-day library card.

I’ve been trying to get back into reading for a while — mainly in a half-hearted attempt to stay off Twitter — and I have yet to find a comfortable way to force myself to read. I love my Kindle, but I often forget to keep the thing charged, and by the time I plug it in, my reading time has already evaporated. Personally, reading on phones, tablets, and other bright displays is a no-go — not only does it kill my eyes, but I always find myself distracted by notifications and other apps. I have had some luck with audiobooks rented from the library, although I wish my loans lasted a little bit longer.


So, how have you spent the last decade and a half reading e-books? Do you have a dedicated reader, something like a Kindle or Boox’s latest effort? Are you sticking with a tablet, or even your smartphone for easy portability? Maybe you’re reading everything on your laptop — that’s how I powered through textbooks in college. However you’re reading lately, let us know below. Multiple options are open, so feel free to check everything that applies to you.

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